Ben Crowder /blog

#new-testament

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As we were starting to review next week’s Come, Follow Me lesson tonight, my wife noticed that her copy of my New Testament study edition was missing the first four verses of Luke 1. Turns out the first three verses of Revelation 1 were missing as well.

Some digging around uncovered that the way I was extracting the verses (from the HTML the Church had sent me) was missing those particular verses because they were wrapped in an extra div. I hadn’t noticed it and wasn’t accounting for it. I should have caught it when I proofed the book before release, honestly, but I hadn’t considered missing verses as a possible error. (Hubris.)

Lulu generally doesn’t take returns, unfortunately, and they also don’t give me any contact information for customers, so what I’ve resorted to is updating the NT study edition page with an explanatory note and download links for the fixed pages. People with affected copies can print them out and insert them into their copy. It’s not ideal, but that’s how publishers often handle this kind of situation, and beyond that I’m not sure what else I can do. (Other than feel awful about the whole thing, of course.)

Old and New Testaments in JSON

Scriptures in JSON

The JSON versions of the Old and New Testaments are now available.

Also, I’ve compared all five standard works against the text on LDS.org and have fixed dozens of typos, a list of which you can see in the README changelog. (I had mistakenly assumed that my source text had been corrected, but that doesn’t seem to be the case.) None of the typos were doctrinal in nature — they’re all minor typographical fixes — but I recommend updating nonetheless.

Scriptures in Word

At someone’s request, I recently put together Microsoft Word editions of the LDS standard works, for use as study aids. (The person who requested it is using Word to highlight, annotate, and add footnotes/endnotes.) Verse numbers are included.

Process (for the curious)

I downloaded an SQLite version of the scriptures and wrote a Python script to extract the text in the right order, with markers for the headings. I then copied and pasted the whole thing into Word.

In Word, I did some wildcard-based find-and-replacing to remove the heading markers and apply the appropriate styles, and then I added a hanging indent so the verse numbers are less obtrusive.